Get Out Of Town, Literally. Why Taking A Break Is Good For Every Part of You.

The Rat Race & The Human Hamster Wheel

If you’re like me, your life is a bit like a hamster wheel – but for humans. We live out our best years as quasi-robots bound by a monotonous & perpetual cycle that has been colloquially dubbed the 9-to-5. This cycle is what we’re taught as children that we need to be a part of to be a true success. So, we yearn for it, we give our all to it, & we lose out a lot of time, sleep, & dreams to it.

For most of us, our modern professional lives begin each morning in traffic on the way to the office & end each evening in the same way (but in the opposite direction, obvs.) We see little of our family, & even less of our friends. We connect online & see children growing up through social media.

The Exaltation Of Busyness

Outside of the office we’re tired. No, we’re more than that. We’re exhausted. Don’t just take it from me, take it from number crunchers & geeky scientists who tell us that we need to be working less & living more.

Instead of making martyrs of ourselves at the altar of the 9-to-5 (which, let’s face it, is more like 7-to-6 when we break down the long days & the hours we’re working outside of the norm) we need to be paying attention to our relationships, our health, & our goals outside of post campaign implementation reports & P&L ledgers.

We need to stop praying at the altar of Busyness. Being busy is not a badge to be worn proudly, it’s the opposite of such. Restfulness, taking time to think through strategy & projects, & building in space to be creative is necessary now more than ever in professional spaces.

Come Fly With Me, Let’s Fly, Let’s Fly Away

So how do we break the mould & ensure we’re working at our most optimal level without breaking the bank or breaking away from work we enjoy or need to do?

One thing we can all do is simply take a break.

We’re so lucky here in NZ to get 4 weeks off a year paid, minimum. Four weeks! Taken in one big chunk, or broken into mini-vacations or multiple long-weekends throughout the year, it is imperative that we all take time off & out from the office.

At last count, there were over 70 million unused vacation days on the books across New Zealand. WTAF?!?! 70 million. That’s a lot of time for head-clearing, family bonding, & adventuring.

When I talk to people who’ve banked a WHOLE FREAKING LOT of time off, my mind boggles. Whether it be deadlines & deliverables, the perceived cost of taking time off, or simply a bad co-dependent relationship with a job – excuses for not taking time off run the gauntlet of human imagination in full.

My take on all of it? I call poppycock.

Time off doesn’t have to be expensive. You can chose a staycation & stay at home. Get some goals ticked off the list in your own backyard. That is a win in & of itself! Too time strapped & trapped by deadlines? Bah humbug. If there’s no one to take on your workload while you’re away, then set expectations clearly. If you set boundaries when it comes to recharging & you communicate them openly, I have always found that people will respect them.

The Importance Of Time Off

To be your best self – at work & at home – you need to know who you are. Without a title. Without a corner office. Without a uniform on. Beyond the office. Who are you at the core?

Getting to know yourself means you’ll be more engaged, confident, & driven across all verticals of your life.

What follows are the main ingredients in self-discovery that you can only undertake when you’re outside of your routine. When you’re resting up, heading out, & expanding your understanding of the wider world around you.

  • Exploring
    • When you’re exploring a world beyond the usual day-in-day-out that you’re accustomed to whilst working, your health improves on all levels. My family & often I always end up walking a lot more when we’re on vacation. Our physical fitness goes up, not down! And, our mental fitness becomes stronger, too. I’d be willing to wager that the simple act of exploration is the most impactful way of turning off from routine & flipping the switch on self-actualisation.
  • Adventuring
    • As with exploring, adventuring is such an important thing to take & make time for. Adventures can be undertaken anywhere with anyone, so embracing an attitude of fun & discovery is one of the best ways I know of switching off & truly experiencing life. Just last month, my biggest adventure was driving to Las Vegas in the middle of a desert winter – on a whim. Thanks to the whim, my wife & I both ended up not only in Las Vegas, but also dancing on stage with Elton John. Adventurous? Heck yes. Did it change me? Yes, yes, yes. So much so for the better. The more I feel a need to break free, the more I embrace adventure.
  • Learning
    • Taking a break & getting away teaches us all more than any meeting in a boardroom or worship at a conference. By stretching beyond our norms, we learn more about people, cultures, & become more empathetic. Having a larger world view & understanding more about how different people live allows us to come back to our own workplaces more educated. With empathy, kindness, & learning on holiday, we become better business people in the longterm.
  • Refocusing passions
    • When you have some free time & space to explore, adventure, & learn – you invariably will start thinking about your passions. What are the things that drive you & what do you stand for? Do these values & passions translate into your daily working life? What you often find while taking time away is clarity. Clarity of purpose is something everyone’s searching for, most of the time you’ll only find it when you’re not looking for it. It will define you, not the other way around. Allow yourself time to refocus.
  • Setting goals
    • Setting goals is a huge part of taking time out. Whether you run away to a beach where the cocktails are bottomless, or you find a hiking trail that takes you far off the beaten track, one wonderful thing that happens when you get away from the office is that you’re able to set goals on your own. Being able to work through your own goals without the weight of corporate infrastructure means that you’re much better armed to set goals within the confines of a corporation when you’re back. Clearly knowing what it is that you want to achieve makes achieving things easier.

All in all, we live in a busy, fragmented time. A time in which we work long hours & disregard our own needs when it comes to relaxing & recharging.

My advice? Dream bigger.

Take time to explore the world beyond your daily routine. And, when your batteries are recharged, head back to work ready to do the absolute best that you can do!

Manhattan Beach Palm Trees, California

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